director

Anisha Sahni : Interview with a Digital Art Director

Anisha Sahni | Art Director, FoxyMoron – North

Why are you into Advertising?
I have always wanted to work in a creative industry. Be it advertising or animation. However, currently 3D animation especially in India has a long way to go. The characterization and 2D elements of animation are what caught my interest and I realized that I could apply the same fundamentals in Advertising. Cracking the idea, conceptualizing and executing the look along with marketing the idea, is how an animation is produced. It’s the same in advertising, but only quicker. That is what grabbed my interest and the fact that you could really think completely outside the box and not be limited to a script.

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Sujoy Roy: Interview with a Senior Creative Director

Sujoy joined advertising because it allowed him to go to work in his cargo shorts. He is convinced that Superman exists. Has a couple of imaginary friends. And echoes Christopher Nolan’s belief that an idea is the most resilient parasite in the world. 

11 years in the industry. 11 years at Ogilvy. 2 offices in India. And an expat stint at Ogilvy Sri Lanka has collectively increased his insatiable appetite for great work and ideas beyond boundaries. He has a Cannes lion and an Ad fest Gold along with credits at the London International Festival, Young Guns and World Press Awards. If he is on leave, you’ll find him fishing for talent as a visiting faculty at media institutes or creating curious Bong and Chinese concoctions at his father’s restaurant in Kolkata.

Why are you into Advertising?
Because I hate wearing a tie and absolutely despise formal trousers.

Did you attend school for fine art or design or Communications?
No. I learnt how to use alphabets to form words and sentences in school. And heading the Students Union as General Secretary of Presidency College, Kolkata, taught me everything I needed to know about management.

Tell us about your recent work campaign?
We have recently rolled out a campaign for Kwiknic, a nicotine gum from ITC and pulled off a charming poster on Hot Wheels.

Were there any particular role models for you when you grew up?
Yes. My dad is my hero. I have inherited his energy and passion. And my bosses Sumanto Chattopahyay and Zenobia Pithawalla are the reason why I have reached where I have. Without them I would have ended up as just another anonymous summer trainee at Ogilvy Mumbai.

Who was the most influential personality on your career in Advertising?
Piyush Pandey.

Where do you get your inspiration from?
By observing my 19-month-old son. He is the most creative person I know.

Tell us something about Ogilvy and Mather, Kolkata work environment.
Well, we’re a tight nucleus as a team. There are no cubicles. Its just one big floor full of loud and boisterous people jamming together to create meaningful work. And we hate to introduce ourselves as colleagues.

Tell us about your first job in Advertising.
I started with Ogilvy Mumbai. When the office was at Lower Parel. It was that Alice in Wonderland feeling. Distinct. Heady. And mind-boggling. I mean, Piyush Pandey walking up and down the isles of the Creative Department. That rabbit hole was the most colourful one I have ever seen.

What do you think of the state of Print advertising right now? At least here in India, the released work is most often too sad.
Good print advertising still works like magic. You just need to change the lens on it. I think the static work on the web is very similar to print advertising. Print, I guess, is evolving.

Do you think brands whose advertising wins awards, do well in the market?
Ab-so-lute-ly. Advertising that’s effective is creative. Look at Dove ‘Real Beauty Sketches’ and Dumb ways to die.

What advice do you have for aspiring creative professionals?
Build a book that you’d like to place next to you in your grave.

Your dream project?
I would love to write an animation film for my son and get Pixar to do it.

Your upcoming campaigns, if you can talk about it 🙂
That wouldn’t be wise, right?

Who would you like to take out for dinner?
My wife, Sharmishtha. I can’t remember the last time we went out for dinner. We are the proud parents of a toddler, you see.

What’s on your iPod?
I don’t own one.

Mac or PC?
Mac.

 

 

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Learn Music Midgets Board

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Saree Board

 

Ajanta Anjaneri

Daulatabad

 

 

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Kolkata Rickshaw Kolkata Taxi

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Ratnagiri

Sinhagad

 

10 Downing Street Pub by Dentsu Bangalore

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Advertised brand: 10 Downing Street Pub, Chennai Traffic Police
Advert title(s): Had a Drink? Think!

Advertising Agency: Dentsu India Group

Executive Creative Director: Ashwin Parthiban, Shiv Parameswaran
Creative Director: Rathish P Subramaniam, Sachit Sadanandan
Art Director: Rathish P Subramaniam, Shiv Parameswaran
Copywriter: Sachit Sadanandan, Ashwin Parthiban

Additional credits:
Production House – Silent Picture Company
Director – Mark Manuel
Executive Producer – Balaji Selvaraj
Camera – Anbu Dennis, Vignesh Vasu, Jagadeesh Ravichandran
Assistant Director – Al Hoon
Music – Timothy Madhukar
Sound Engineer – Sean Bout
Post Production – RGB
Offline – Manohar
Online – Mohan
Computer Graphics – Velu

Short rationale (optional):
‘Don’t drink and drive’. Its a message that is so ubiquitous in big cities, it has actually become a blind spot. What this jaded ‘public’ message needed was a personal touch. An emotional connect that would not only make people notice this message, but act on it.
Had a Drink? Think!

Valiyaveetil Sanoop : Interview

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From Payyanur, village in Kannur, Kerala. Started career with JWT Bangalore and now working as a senior visualizer at O&M Bangalore.

Why are you an Illustrator?
Because i love illustration, more than being an illustrator, i would like to be an art director

Did you attend school for fine art or design?
Yes i did. Got graduated in Applied Arts from college of fine arts, Trivandrum. Kerala.

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Karthik M : Interview with an advertising creative

 

Just like it says on his website, Karthik M is a guy who loves to make things, who lives with his musical better half, and who sincerely believes that one day both his feline sons will start talking to him. He loves doing side projects, just like Ji Lee and SwissMiss. He’s the author of @mysmallstories on Twitter. He keeps a thick beard to hide his double chin, and will often scratch it while pretending to think. He finds it very, very difficult to write about himself, be it in the third person, or out of that person.

Why are you into Advertising?
Because it lets me revel in my misfit-ness, and pays me for it too.
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Priti Nair : Interview

Why are you into Advertising?
Well frankly I finished college with English Literature and at that time the three professions were teaching (which meant I had to study more)  journalism (which I was not keen on) and advertising (that like everyone else thinks I thought was yummy to do).

Did you attend school for fine art or design or Communications?
I did a diploma course in copywriting. That kind of initially outlined even if it was scratchily so an idea about the business .it also made me do an assignment that got me a job at DART advertsing

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Shakoon Khosla : Art Director at Ogilvy

I work as an art director in Ogilvy and have worked with TBWA and Rediffusion as well. Am a bit zonked out and have goldfish memory. I often forget my illustration styles and come up with new one every time : ) I like experimenting with fonts in addition to helvetica and get twitchy while using lot of bright colors together.

Why are you in advertising?
I figured out this is the only place where you can be unorganized, wear whatever you want to and get a chance to create good stuff : )
Coming back to the point, the work we churn out here has extremely short shelf life hence its fun to match up the speed. I love the unpredictableness of this place, it just doesn’t let you get comfortable with your state of mind.
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Interview: Anil Kakar

Anil started his advertising career close to 18 years ago and has worked with agencies such as Leo Burnett, Enterprise Nexus, Ambience Publicis, SSC&B Lintas and Percept Hakuhodo. Along the way, he has helped build brands such as Canon, Panasonic, Pantaloon, Taj Hotels, FedEx, Killer Jeans, Westside, Raymond, Siyaram, The Times Of India, Femina, The Economic Times, Brand Equity, Indiatimes.com, Pierre Cardin, Thums Up, Lakme, Vicks, Nerolac Paints, Park Avenue, to name a few. Anil’s work has been featured in several award shows and advertising festivals. His work for The Times Of India was the first Indian campaign to have won the Campaign of the Year award at the Asia Pacific Adfest; the campaign also picked up the same award at the Abby Awards. His work for Vladivar Vodka and Georgia Gullini clothing was showcased in the international Archive magazine. At SSC&B, Anil’s creative work helped the agency win the ‘Most improved agency of the year’ title, moving up from Rank 52 to Rank 18 in less than a year, within the Lowe network. As Bombay Creative Head at Percept, his work helped the agency garner more than 40 awards over a span of 2 years. Anil has been a member of the jury at the New York Festivals, Goafest and the Outdoor Advertising Awards. Anil regularly contributes articles to FHM magazine and is also working on his first fiction novel.

Why are you into advertising?
When I was a kid, my father owned an ad agency. Back then, there were no computers and he used to manually cut typefaces printed on bromides. He used to cut it very carefully, with a pair of scissors set the type for each ad with his own hands. As a teenager, I couldn’t help but get fascinated by the whole process. Often, I used to help him source typefaces from Letraset and various international magazines and I think that exposed me to the wonder of advertising; unknowingly, it helped me find beauty in typography, writing and art. Thanks to him, I could tell a Bodoni from a Futura, while I was still in school. In retrospect, this went a long way in defining the future. As it turned out, a few years later, my father got a job and so we had to move out and I found myself in Bombay and that marked the turning point of my life. I remember, a long, long time ago, while I was still wet behind the ears, I visited the CAG exhibition where I happened to see the Mauritius Tourism campaign and an electric sort of feeling ran through my spine and that was when I decided, I should be in advertising.
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Prathap Suthan | NCD, Cheil India

I was born in Trivandrum, the capital of Kerala. Advertising calls it ‘God’s own country’, but I’d rather call it as the land that lives under a zillion coconut palms, drunk on toddy, and green with backwaters.

I will be 46 this year, am married to Jyothi – Jo to friends. She is a textile designer and an NID graduate. We have a son – Abhimanyu, who is now in his 12th standard.

I went to Loyola School and Mar Ivanios College, and gorged on debates, word-games, rum, cricket and everything else from Abba, Beatles, Bach, Orff, Ayn Rand, Wodehouse, Leon Uris, Shakespeare, Kurosawa, Coppola, to Asterix and Legionnaire Beau Peep.

I lived in Philadelphia between 1985 – 86, to help out my cousins with our family business. But all I did was travel around, went looking for John Denver’s country roads, stood through Live Aid, climbed the Rockies, and kept aching for my bed back home.

When I got back, all I wanted to do was write. I joined a small agency in Trivandrum, and by the time I sorted my fonts out, Mudra Communications – Ahmedabad, hired me. I spent 9 years there, 11 years in Grey, and now I am into my 3rd year at Cheil.

Essentially, I am still a copywriter. I cannot give up my soul. It’s been fed and raised on Fred Woodward’s typography, Ammirati’s BMW print ads, Television Registers and Shots, National Geographic, Japanese art and art direction, foreign films with and without subtitles, world music, Economist, and at least one new random website every day.

I will always be a student of our industry. And I don’t think I will be happier doing anything else. I am as good or bad as my last campaign, and you could call me Pat.
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