Amod Dani : Interview

292905_10151084842651310_1754473987_n

Amod is a Vice President & Senior Creative Director at Contract, Mumbai

Amod is a simple guy who just wants to be happy doing some good work and making some long-lasting friends in the process.

Why are you into Advertising?
I can give a long spiel in response to this question but the simple truth is that I am in Advertising because I knew this is what would make me happy. I have always enjoyed watching great ads, and Piyush’s work for Fevicol truly inspired me to take the plunge into this mad world. I am in it because I find my source of happiness here.

Did you attend school for fine art or design or Communications?
I did do my stint at Mudra Institute of Communications, Ahmedabad.

Tell us about a recent campaign you worked on?
I had a fabulous time working on the Asian Paints Royale campaign for Kerala, my very first Malayalam ad. Though I’ve spent close to 16 years in the gulf I never had the opportunity to brush up on my Malayalam. This was the chance and what must I say, it was Nalla Bhangi (Very Beautiful)!

Were there any particular role models for you when you grew up?
My parents are my role models.
They have always guided me, inspired me, reprimanded me and taught me valuable life lessons. I dread to know where or what I would have been if not for them.

Who was the most influential personality on your career in Advertising?
I don’t believe there is a single individual who can have a significant impact on one’s career in Advertising. One makes his/ her career due to the positive impact of many such individuals: Individuals who enter your life to teach you, to inspire you and to improve you, not only as a creative person but also as a human being.
Throughout my nascent career I have been fortunate enough to have met and learned from Advertising greats such as Priti Nair, Pops, Nitesh Tiwari, Harshad Rajadhyakshya and Paddy.
And last but not the least, Sadanand Narvekar, a friend, philosopher and guide, and a Creative Director who played a significant role in shaping my career.

Where do you get your inspiration from?
People. People inspire me constantly. I feed off their enthusiasm, their passion, their nuances, their interesting anecdotes, their energies, their fallacies, their strengths, their unique characteristics and personalities.

Tell us something about the Contract work environment. With such a large team, how does that affect individuality and creativity.
Contract is in an Agency which has truly stayed honest to the art of creativity. I see here a constant endeavor to break the shackles of mediocrity. Contract is an Agency on the tipping point. And with such a large team of superb talent I’m confident the ultimate goal will be achieved sooner than we think.

What do you think of the state of Print advertising right now. At least here in India, the released work is most often too sad? Are agencies ignoring released print?
I wouldn’t say the released work is sad. That is not a fair assumption. We must realize that the market dynamics have changed, the newspaper reach has magnified a lot, and hence the print rates have gone through the roof. Innovation in press nowadays hits our clients’ wallets big time. The pressure to deliver is higher than ever. So in order to reduce communication dilution a marketing mix today looks at press as an extension of the Television idea. Not the ideal case scenario, I agree. But not fair to call the press work sad either.

Agencies like ours do not ignore print. We believe in the strength of the medium and honestly pursue to create work on which we can proudly display our key number.

Pick and tell us about one of all your past campaigns, your personal favourite…
I truly enjoyed working on the Uninor ‘Coin recharge’ campaign during my stint with Leo Burnett Delhi. This I would say brings back some pleasant memories.

Do you think brands who’s advertising wins awards, do well in the market?
Definitely. The Gunn report has proved it that the most awarded brands are also the brands which have done supremely well in the market. Great creativity had built, is building and will continue to build great brands while adding to the balance sheet.

What advice do you have for aspiring creative professionals?
Firstly, I don’t know if I am old enough or capable enough to give anyone any advice regarding anything. But since you’ve asked me the question, I can only state an observation which may help: We must be relentless and never stop trying. Just because our ideas are bombed doesn’t mean we can’t come up with something better. The last idea wasn’t the only good one we can come up with, so let’s not feel frustrated and not get worked up. We must keep at it, be focused and should never stop trying, come what may.

Mac or PC?
Love the Mac, stuck with a PC

Who would you like to take out for dinner?
My family, I don’t get to spend much time with them nowadays.

What’s on your iPod?
Still saving up to buy one ;)

 

0ab15fe3e7819f38b0f91d67ec9277e1

baf831c506dac3beab9d5d5c5682307e

e4b9b5fa2c3adb75a25077325ab496c8

ee7840ec44d4f0bf3781b53bc9439fab

2 thoughts on “Amod Dani : Interview

  1. bottleHeD says:

    Would have loved to see more work.

  2. Meera S says:

    Yes, more work please. Also i don’t agree with you about the print question. It really is sad and ignored. Leave aside innovation, the same ads can be written and designed much better. That doesn’t require major shift in client’s budgets and dynamics. Still we dont see anyne concentrating on print.

    From what i have experienced, the art directors are too busy with their scams for D&ADs and the copywriters are too busy making friends with film producers in the hope of becoming film makers themselves.

    I find many copywriters these days unable to write even a leave application.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *